Categories
film

Library of Congress Packard Campus Tour

On Columbus Day, 2017, I was able to go on a tour during the open house at the Packard Campus of the Library of Congress. This is where they process and store many audio-visual objects. For a film and media geek like me, it was a dream come true.

Film editing table
film editing table
rows and rows of sound recordings
rows and rows of sound recordings
file digitization
file digitization
image processing and cleanup
image processing and cleanup
automated video transfer
automated video transfer
film editing station
film editing station
audio equipment
audio equipment
nitrate film storage vault
nitrate film storage vault
film strip
nitrate film strip with damage

The Nuclear Bunker Preserving Movie History

Categories
About Me

Welcome

I’m Laurie Robey, and this is my online home. I’ll be posting some information about things that I’m interested in, like preserving, conserving, and restoring cultural artifacts, the natural world, technology, arts & humanities, and science.

If you want to see my resume, I suggest you go to my LinkedIn profile.

Categories
public domain

Works in the Public Domain

In 2019, many works became public domain under US Copyright law. These search results list many books that fall into this category: Hathi Trust Digital Library Search Results of volumes published in 1923 for the purpose of sharing what works will become public domain in the U.S. in 2019.

Categories
history

Armistice Day 2018

When I was in junior high school, I took a class about World War I, taught by Miss Babashanian (later Mrs. Williams). It’s a shame that World War I doesn’t get more thorough coverage in history class. It set the stage for many of the following conflicts of the 20th century. The more context people have about history, the more they understand our present and possible futures.

The 100th anniversary of the end of World War I occurs Sunday, November 11, 2018. It was the end of 4 years of warfare unlike anything the world had experienced up to that time: trenches, chemical weapons, and aircraft entered the scene. Millions of people died without much territory actually changing hands by the end of it. The final treaty, the Treaty of Versailles, set the stage for events leading to World War II.

Leading up to World War I, Queen Victoria of Great Britain had many children who went on to rule many of the nations of Europe (Great Britain, Prussia (a German state), Greece, Romania, Russia, Norway, Sweden and Spain).  Some historians liken World War I to a family spat between the rulers of the European countries involved. The countries of Europe had many intertwining alliances, so once the war started, most of Europe got involved in order to support their allies.

The loss of life and physical and psychological damages done by the war were phenomenal. This is where the term “shell shocked” originated, to describe the post-traumatic stress disorders many people who survived the war suffered. W. Somerset Maugham wrote The Razor’s Edge, a novel whose main character is a pilot traumatized by his experiences in World War I. (I don’t recommend the 1980s movie adaptation, by the way).

So perhaps take some time to think about the consequences of this war on the 100th anniversary of its end.